Where Animal Lovers Pursue Animal Careers

Dog Training

October is National Adopt a Shelter Dog Month

October is
National Adopt a Shelter Dog Month
Adopt A Shelter Dog Month

Shelter dogs and cats deserve a forever home. By adopting or fostering a shelter pet, you are saving an animal’s life. Even if you can’t adopt a new pet, there are several great ways you can help save a dog or cat who is currently living in a shelter.

Use Social Media to Raise Awareness
Share with your friends and followers that October is Adopt a Shelter Dog Month. By doing so you become a part of the saving lives formula. Help raise awareness by using Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, 4square, Tumblr, and Instagram. Consider using #hastags such as #welovedogs, #savedogs, #fosterdogs, #traindogs, and #dogs in your posts. This helps them be found by people searching for industry-related articles on social networking trend walls and blogs, as well as RSS feeds.

Volunteer to Train Shelter Dogs

At Animal Behavior College (ABC), our students and employees have been training shelter dogs since 1998.  It is a fact that a trained dog in a shelter is far more likely to be adopted then one who has not had behavioral training. Since 2004, ABC’s dog training students have collectively donated more than 93,000 hours to animal shelters. This program is called Students Saving Lives. The success has been revolutionary in the fight to save animal lives.
Read more about Students Saving Lives.

Animal Behavior College also offers a Continuing Education Program called Training Shelter Dogs. This program is a great way to help certified dog trainers establish themselves in the dog training industry while doing their part in assisting shelter dogs by providing the behavioral training they need.

Foster Pets from Shelters like, Best Friends or Unwanted NYC Pets

If you love pets but aren’t ready to adopt, opening your home as a foster parent is a great way to help out. Many foster programs make it as easy as possible, giving you the support you need. Here’s how it works:

You provide a temporary place to crash, water, exercise and love.
You receive food and supplies, veterinary care, any support and guidance you need, endless love from your foster pet, and the satisfaction of helping an animal in need.

Best Friends will work with you to find the best match possible for your home and lifestyle. If at any point the foster situation is not working out, Best Friends will take the animal back into its care and find another that will work for you.

Take the Pledge
Join the more than 100,000 people who have already taken the “No Pet Store Puppies” pledge to help fight puppy mill cruelty by refusing to buy anything—including food, supplies or toys—at pet stores and from websites that sell puppies.

Animal Shelters & Rescues in the U.S.

Best FriendsBestFriends.org

Best Friends Animal Society is the only national nonprofit animal welfare organization focused exclusively on ending the killing of dogs and cats in America’s shelters. An authority and leader in the no-kill movement for more than 30 years, Best Friends runs the nation’s largest no-kill sanctuary for companion animals (at its headquarters), regional centers in Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, and New York, as well as life-saving programs in partnership with rescue groups and shelters across the country.

Did you know that more than 9,000 dogs and cats are killed each day in America’s shelters? More than 4 million lives are lost each year simply because they don’t have a safe place to call home. These pets deserve to be saved. At Best Friends Animal Society, they believe no animals should have to die in shelters when solutions exist to save them—solutions like adopting, fostering, spaying/neutering and Trap/Neuter/Return (TNR).

Unwanted NYC Pets - UnwantedNYCpets.org
Unwanted New York City Pets or Unwanted NYC Pets is spearheaded by Betina Wasserman and her team of close knit animal confidants. Together they rescue pets from the kill list and save dogs and cats from all across New York City’s Tri-borough area. Betina is also the founder of Unwanted NYC Pets, a 501-C3 non-profit organization. The Unwanted NYC Pets team is determined to help make the world a better place by saving the lives of dogs, who would otherwise be put down if not rescued. Betina’s message: Don’t buy dogs, please adopt them! Read More

Animal Shelters & Rescues in Canada

Animal Rescue and Outreach Society (AROS) is a charitable, non-profit organization serving the Alberta Capital Region. Their mission is to rescue and rehabilitate displaced pets, and to provide education and support to pet owners.
Learn more about Animal Rescue and Outreach Society

Keeping Indoors Cats Properly Exercised

Keeping Indoors Cats

Properly Exercised

By Sandy Robins

Indoor Cat Exercises

Enthusiastic playing does more than stave off boredom, it also provides exercise and helps hone a cat’s natural behaviors.

Indoor Cats Need to Play, Too

There’s no question that cats who have an indoors-only lifestyle are much safer and better protected from environmental dangers, such as flea and tick infestations and predators. But at the same time, they miss out on exercise opportunities the great outdoors has to offer. Therefore, it’s important to compensate by instituting play times that offer both exercise and a chance to hone their natural instincts to hunt, pounce and play.

Cats are not supposed to be decorative couch potatoes. Those who spend a lot of time curled up sleeping do so because they are bored and lonely. In fact, felines enjoy short bursts of playtime throughout the day. If you are working, consider splitting your mini-feline workouts to before work and again in the evening.

For interactive play sessions, laser toys are great. They also allow you to multitask by enjoying a cup of coffee and possibly even reading a book while manipulating a laser dot to fly around the room and shimmy across the floor. Lasers rev up a cat’s prey drive. You need to let the beam rest in a spot long enough for your feline to pounce and try to capture her prey. Never get the beam in her eyes. Also, because laser play isn’t really a fair game—after all, your cat will never catch anything—give her a treat at the end of each session. And make sure the next toy you bring out is one she can actually capture and kick around with her paws.

Wand toys are also great fun and really allow cats to pounce and hone their natural hunting skills, too.

Cats are really smart and many enjoy playing games of fetch. They can be trained to bring toys to you to engage in more play. Small material mice are great for such interactive play, as are feline stationary items—the latest post-it notes and other paper products infused with catnip and make wonderful crinkly noises when batted about. Some cats will even bring you their favorite wand toy to encourage you to play more.

To help stave off boredom while you are out working, a “treasure hunt” comprising of her favorite toys and treats will keep her actively engaged during your absence.

The idea is to hide her favorite toys in different places around the home. Focus on places you know she is likely to seek out,such as her favorite scratchers and snooze zones. Hide treats, too. If you are worried about putting out too many treats, you can take a portion of her kibble allowance and put it out instead. Apart from simply placing the treats next to catnip toys, consider placing small amounts inside special feline treat balls and puzzle toys. These will help keep her both mentally and physically stimulated.

If your feline is one of those cats with a reputation for the nighttime crazies—rushing around the house at 2.00 a.m. when you are trying to sleep—consider scheduling your last play session together just before you go to bed. It should tire her out and induce her to come and cuddle in and sleep, too.

By getting involved in feline fun and games, you are also spending real quality time together. It’s a great way to strengthen that wonderful emotional bond you share with your cat(s).


About the Author: Sandy Robins is the 2013 winner of the “Excellence in Journalism and Outstanding Contribution to the Pet Industry Award.” Her work appears on many of the country’s leading pet platforms, such as MSNBC.com, MSN.com and TODAYShow.com. She is a regular contributor and columnist in multiple national and international publications, including Cat Fancy, as well as the author of the award-winning books “Fabulous Felines: Health and Beauty Secrets for the Pampered Cat” and “For The Love of Cats.” Learn more about Sandy on her website or Facebook page. #welovecats

AKC’s Canine Good Citizen Award

AKC’s Canine Good Citizen Award

By Audrey Pavia

Sit and Stay, German Shepherd Dog, AKC Good Canine Citizen Award

A Good Canine Citizen is capable of maintaining a Sit-Stay until called by his owner.

If you’ve got a purebred or mixed breed dog who listens when you tell him what to do, is good with other dogs, and is just a joy to be around, he’s a perfect candidate for the American Kennel Club’s Canine Good Citizen (CGC) award. And if your dog’s behavior leaves something to be desired, start working on fixing it, with the CGC as your goal.

In order to earn a CGC award, your dog has to pass a 10-step test that consists of the following:

  • Accepting a friendly stranger. While you have your dog on a leash, a person will approach you, say “Hello” and shake your hand. Your dog is expected to stay calm and ignore the person. Your dog is not to jump on the person or show any aggression.
  • Sitting politely for petting. The stranger who approached you will bend down to pet your dog. Your dog is expected to stand calmly while being petted. He’s not supposed to jump on the person or shy away.
  • Appearance and grooming. Your dog will allow someone to groom him and examine him (touch his ears and lift his front feet) while you are holding his leash.
  • Walking loosely on leash. You walk your dog across the examination yard on a loose leash. Your dog doesn’t pull on the leash, or refuse to follow.
  • Walking calmly through a crowd. At least three people will stand in the examination yard while you walk your dog through the group. He is expected to walk quietly past without jumping on people or straining at the leash.
  • Performing the sit and down on command, and staying. You will ask your dog to sit. You will then ask him to lie down. Once he has performed these commands, you can keep him in the down position or put him back in a sit, and then tell him to stay. You then step back away from him. He is expected to stay in place for several seconds.
  • Coming when called. Someone will hold your dog while you walk away from him. Once you are 10-feet away, you turn around and call your dog to you. He is expected to return to you immediately.
  • Reaction to another dog. Someone with a dog on a leash will approach you and your dog. Your dog is expected to ignore the handler and the other dog. He is not supposed strain on the leash, act aggressive or behave in an out-of-control way.
  • Keeping calm during a distraction. Your dog will be asked to act confidently during two common distractions, such as dropping a large object nearby or having a jogger run past.
  • Waiting calmly for his owner while being supervised by a stranger. You will hand your dog to someone and then walk away and hide out of sight. Your dog is expected to wait quietly during the three minutes when he can’t see you. He is not to bark, whine or act unruly.

If your dog doesn’t sound up for all this, simply enroll him in one of the many CGC preparation classes being held all around the country by dog clubs, pet stores and private trainers, such as an Animal Behavior College Certified Dog Trainer or ABCDT. In this class, your dog will learn to do everything required of him on the test.

Once your dog passes the test, he receives a certificate from the AKC in the mail and the right to wear a CGC tag on his collar. If he’s a purebred, he’s ready to tackle any other AKC performance event, such as obedience, agility or rally. If your dog is a mixed breed, he can still compete in these types of competitions through non-AKC clubs.

For more information, visit the CGC section of the AKC website at:
http://goo.gl/BvDS3r


About the Author: Audrey Pavia is an award-winning freelance writer and author of “The Labrador Retriever Handbook.” She is a former staff editor of Dog Fancy, Dog World and The AKC Gazette magazines. To learn more about her work, visit www.audreypavia.com.

 

Adopt A DOG! Save a Life – One Family’s Fantastic Story

The Story of Daley the Beautiful German Shepherd
Adopt A Dog

Rebel Ernst and her husband wanted to rescue a dog.  They saw a picture of Daley, a 3 1/2 year old German Shepherd, on Petfinder.com and immediately fell in love. Daley soon had her forever home.  I was so touched by the truth of Rebel’s blog post.  Not only is it a great story, it’s one that Rebel took the time to post it to our Facebook wall. It made me smile to know that the Ernsts are just like everyone here at Animal Behavior College (ABC)–they love and care for animals.

Read Daley’s Story by Rebel L. Ernst: https://www.facebook.com/AnimalBehaviorCollege/posts/10151691251447983?notif_t=like

Here at ABC, we’ve decided to share our love of animals in a more visual way. Our marketing team (myself included) and employees from every department have pitched in to create videos that showcase our dedication to pets of all kinds. The videos were also created to share Animal Behavior College’s core values with people throughout the U.S. & Canada. People just like us.

We love dogs and we love cats, too. We are animal lovers to the bone.

Over the last few months, I have been steadily working on our Open Your Heart video series.  Everyone here at ABC wants to share these great messages and help raise awareness and get more pets rescued and  adopted each and every day.

Did you know an untrained dog is more likely to be returned to a shelter after being adopted? This is a big reason why Animal Behavior College was founded by Steven Appelbaum 15 years ago.  Steven immediately brought aboard Debbie Kendrick, a stellar local dog trainer who had worked with Steve at his previous company. Together, they set out on a mission to change the dog-training world. While they knew the two of them could not train every dog in every city, they could teach animal lovers to become dog trainers. Those newly minted dog trainers could then train more dogs throughout North America.

By also educating animal lovers on how to work with their pets, ABC-certified dog trainer help ensure fewer dogs and cats are returned to rescues/shelters. They save animals’ lives.

Speaking of which, did you know that in the process of becoming dog trainers, our students have volunteered more than 93,000 hours in rescues and shelters across North America? We’re not bragging, were are simply telling you, our faithful fans, so you can help us spread the words: Adopt. Spay. Neuter. Train. Love.

Rebel Ernst shared Daley’s Story with us and now we’ve shared it with you. Hopefully, you will tell or share this post on Facebook or by email with other animal lovers.

We would also love to hear your stories. Leave your comments below, Like Us on Facebook and/or send us your adoption and rescue stories to Anthony@dawgbiz.net.

Want to do more? Enroll in Animal Behavior College today. We offer three certification programs, Dog Training, Veterinary Assistance and Dog Grooming, for people across North America who are just like us.

The Story of Daley the Beautiful German Shepherd    Adopt A Dog

Adopt A DOG! Save a Life – One Family’s Fantastic Story

Animal Behavior College Dog Training School

Animal Behavior College Employees Open Their Hearts

Animal Behavior College – Dog Training School


At Animal Behavior College our company is built on the belief that together employees and the students of ABC can help save animal lives.

Animal Behavior College began offering Dog Training Certifications in 1998. Our Founder, Steven Appelbaum believed that training dogs can lead to saving their lives. A well trained dog will be more likely to be adopted to a forever home, and less likely to end up in a shelter to begin with. This passion of Loving pets, Adopting them. Spaying or Neutering, and Training pets has been handed down to employees and students of Animal Behavior College for over 14 years. Now over 10,000 dog training graduates across the U.S. and Canada, we are proud of all our ABC Certified Dog Trainers. ABC Dog Trainers save lives. Together we can change the world. If you are interested in becoming a Dog Trainer please contact our Admissions Department at (800) 795-3294.

We are the #1 Dog Training School in North America. Offering Dog Training Certifications, as well as certifications in Dog Grooming and Veterinary Assistance.

All of the dogs, cats, and animals shown in this video were adopted, rescued, or saved by an Animal Behavior College employee.

Animal Behavior College – Dog Training School

The Story of Max told by Kimberly – Animal Behavior College Employee

 Open Your Heart & Join Us In The Fight to Save Animal Lives


Max, Animal Behavior College, dog rescued named max

This is the story of Animal Behavior College employee Kimberly’s dog, Max.

Max Was Rescued from
the Streets of Georgia

I’m Max and while roaming the streets of Georgia a rescue found me and brought me to California. I had mange, mites, worms, and a double ear infection but my mommy Kimberly adopted me and after a few months, nursed me back to health…now I’m a senior dog living the good life. She said I had won the lottery… but now she says that she did!!  I like to sit in my wagon for long walks and I enjoy relaxing on my own chase lounge when we are camping.

Come Visit Us this weekend Sunday September 15th at Woodley Park in van Nuys, CA for Bestfriends.org – Strut Your Mutt, Save, Adopt and Train shelter dogs. Help raise money for Best Friends Animal Society www.bestfriends.org

ABCDT-L2 Updates – Coming Soon

ABCDT-L2 – Animal Behavior College Dog Training – Level 2

Take a step to further your credentials in Dog training by applying for the ABC Dog Training, Level 2 Certification.

Animal behavior College -Dog Training School Level 2 Certification.

As many of you know, Animal Behavior College is just a few days away from launching the Level 2 Dog Training Certification (ABCDT-L2).  This certification will be available to qualified dog trainers across North America who have met the requisite amount of professional dog training experience and continuing education units. While we definitely appreciate your enthusiasm and interest, please be patient while we are working out the final details. It is our goal to have the website answer all your questions and help you easily navigate through the process of certification. For those of you who would like to get on the email list, please forward your email address, name and contact information to ABCDT-L2info@dawgbiz.net.  Thank you for your patience and understanding. We know you are just as excited as we are about the ABCDT-L2 official launch.  

Thank you for your patience and understanding.

“Students Saving Lives”

Dog Training students volunteer at Best Friends Animal Society in Mission Hills, CA.

Animal Behavior College Dog Training Students volunteer at Best Friends Animal Society in Mission Hills, CA.

The Humane Society of the United States (May 2013), estimates 6 to 8 million cats and dogs enter shelters each year and approximately 2.7 million of them are euthanized, even though they are considered healthy and adoptable.

It’s been said that one death is a tragedy, a million is a statistic. At Animal Behavior College (ABC), we do not agree with that and we are doing something to help prevent such wonderful animals from becoming death-row dogs and cats.  

The “Students Saving Lives” program at Animal Behavior College is part of the school’s international campaign to improve shelter dog rehabilitation and adoption. All students in the ABC certified dog trainer instructor program are asked to volunteer at least 10 hours of training time to a local shelter, humane society or rescue organization. Since 2004, more than 7,800 ABC students have donated in excess of 92,000 hours to animal shelters and rescue facilities across North America helping pets find forever homes.

I’d be happy to connect you with actual students within specific geographic areas who are currently saving lives at shelters and rescues. In addition, ABC’s founder and CEO Steven Appelbaum is available to discuss how the “Student Saving Lives” program came together, why it was created, and how the program reduces the amount of animals who become death-row dogs and cats.

Steven, a trainer for 30+ years, is a lecturer, consultant and contributing podcast co-host for “Love that Dog Hollywood.” I will call to follow up in few days.

 

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About ABC: Animal Behavior College was founded in 1998 and the school’s unique structure incorporates a distance-learning and hands-on externship-training model. ABC offers courses for certified dog training, pet grooming and veterinary assistants in all 50 states and every Canadian province, making it the largest vocational school of its kind in North America.   Beginning in January 2013, ABC now offers an onsite classroom program for certified dog training. The second, six-month session began on June 24.

 

 

Animal Behavior College Graduation 2013 – Dog Training Certification

ABC Dog Trainer Classroom Program

Monday June 17th, was one of the best days ever for the five students of our On-site ABC Dog Trainer Classroom Program. Why? All five students graduated the program with honors. To be an honors graduate each student is required to obtain above 90% on all the exams taken during the Classroom Program.

ABC is committed to helping its military students with tuition assistance and funding is available for qualified military families. We are proud to announce that four of the five graduates are Veterans of the U.S. military.

The Dog Trainer Classroom Program has the approval to train veterans and eligible persons under the provisions of title 38, United States Code.

Two of the graduates are pictured below, both were happy to tell us why they chose ABC.

Animal Behavior College - Dog Training Program graduate Diana Mogensen.

Animal Behavior College – Dog Training Program graduate Diana Mogensen.

 

Diana Mogensen

Diana has always loved pets and has been rescuing dogs from the streets of Las Vegas, NV for many years. Diana decided to better her skills to train dogs, so that she could train the strays she was saving.

This is what led her to Animal Behavior College Dog Training Program. Diana has been serving in the United States Army Reserves since she was 19. Now 7 years later she is still currently serving in the U.S. Army Reserves.

 

 

 

 

Nikole Iudica

Nikole Iudica - Dog Trainer Graduate of the Animal Behavior College On-Site Dog Training Program.

Nikole Iudica – Dog Trainer Graduate of the Animal Behavior College On-Site Dog Training Program.

 

Nikole’s Dog Training career began back when she was a small girl. At the age of 10 her parents give her a certificate good for one Puppy of her choice, but the catch was that she had to prove to her parents she was responsible enough to take care of the dog.

Right away Nikole began reading several books about Dog Training, and she prepared a PowerPoint presentation for her parents. Once her parents could see she was serious and ready for the challenge they took her to adopt an Italian Greyhound mix named Tiny.

Nikole worked with Tiny and trained him each day at home, and while going to retrieve the mail from her mailbox up the street. It didn’t take her very long to teach the dog to sit and follow her commands. As she kept walking Tiny, the neighbors began to take notice of how well trained the dog actually was. Soon many of her neighbors asked Nikole to train their dogs.

It was that moment that she knew that Dog Training was something she was good at, and she loved it. As Nikole grew up and moved out on her own she rescued Cooper, a mix of Rottweiler, American Staffordshire, and English Bulldog, from the Castaic Animal Shelter. While training Cooper at the local dog park, people took notice of how well the dog responded to her and the recall training she had done with him.

The dog park visitors would stop and say what a fine job she was doing. After several suggestions by patrons to become a Professional Dog Trainer, Nikole decided to attend a school for dog trainers at Animal Behavior College. Now a graduate of ABC’s On-site Dog Trainer Classroom Program, Nikole has over 13 years experience training dogs and has been rescuing dogs since 2009. Nikole is now the owner of Pawesome Animal Training located in Santa Clarita Valley. She hopes to continue helping dogs and their owners better communicate.

 

Find out more by watching the event coverage by Studio Santa Clarita.

Animal Behavior College (ABC) is a vocational school that specializes in animal-related career training.

Thinking of a career in Dog Training, Dog Grooming, or Veterinary Assistant?

Visit: http://www.animalbehaviorcollege.com/