Holiday Pet Tips for a great season and a Happy New Year from Animal Behavior College

Wednesday, December 19, 2012 : 9:40:02 AM
Updated Wednesday, December 19, 2012 : 9:42:19 AM
Holiday Pet Tips for a great season and a
Happy New Year from Animal Behavior College

The holiday season can be a fantastic experience for many people. Itís also a time for pet owners to be aware of holiday safety precautions for the animals they love:

Festive Food. While we enjoy delicious holiday foods, itís important to remember that whatís good for us can possibly be harmful for our pets. A piece of turkey or chicken can cause more harm than good. Poultry skin is greasy and fatty for dogs and might cause diarrhea and/or an upset stomach. In some instances, particularly with older dogs, this can even cause or exacerbate Pancreatitis. Poultry bones can splinter and cause stomach and intestinal issues, which may even require surgery in some cases. Raw or undercooked poultry can contain Salmonella which is as toxic for dogs as it is for you. Plus, often one treat leads to a second and a fifth, and then before you know it your pet is on the road to obesity.

Did you know that chocolate can be dangerous for most animals and especially for dogs? It can cause seizures, convulsions or even death. If you suspect your dog has eaten a sizeable amount of chocolate, immediately contact your veterinarian.

Donít know what to do with that fruit cake you received for Christmas? Donít give it to your pet! Peaches and plums contain pits which if ingested can cause intestinal blockage. The pits also contain trace amounts of cyanide which needless to say is toxic to pets and to us. Raisins can also cause kidney problems in dogs

Mushrooms, onions, chives, grapes, walnuts, and macadamia nuts are also on the forbidden list as is nutmeg which can actually be quite deadly.

Christmas specifics: Mistletoe and holly are poisonous to animals and make sure they are placed well out of reach. If ingested they can cause diarrhea and nausea. Dogs and cats that chew inappropriate items need to be managed during the holidays. These pets should be taught to like a crate or exercise pen where they can go for alone time and be safe when you canít watch them because youíre busy with holiday guests, etc. Both should be large enough for the pet to stretch out and be comfortable and not used for punishment. Proper play and chew toys as well as pet treats should be included in the crate and itís important to make this a positive experience for the pet. Teaching your pets to focus on proper toys makes them far less likely to get into holiday mischief.

Live and artificial Christmas trees can also be a risk to pets and should not be eaten by dogs and cats. The water at the base of live trees is sometimes treated with a solution that keeps the tree alive longer and should not be ingested. Itís best to block the tree from the pet which, especially with cats is easier said than done. Make sure ornaments are well secured directly to the tree and are hung on the top part of the tree and not low enough for a kitten or puppy to reach up and grab. Avoid playing with or teasing the cat or dog with any ornaments including the tinsel type that cats often find irresistible. Make sure any wiring is placed out of reach when possible and coated with pipe or at the very least tape. Extension cords used to light the tree or other objects should be the kind that shut off automatically if they are damaged. All wires and cords can be sprayed with a bitter tasting solution like Bitter Apple. This and other brands can be purchased at your pet store or on-line.

These simple, important tips can make the holidays a magical time for everyone, including your furry friends.

Steve Appelbaum is the president of Animal Behavior College, the largest animal career vocational school of its kind in North America. He has been a professional dog trainer for over 30 years and is a published author, lecturer, and animal podcast co-host.

For more information: www.AnimalBehaviorCollege.com/info or call 888-600-7220.

Media inquiries: Teresa Mathers - teresa@dawgbiz.net. 888-338-7778

Request Information





Yes




Yes

I understand that submitting my information authorizes Animal Behavior College to contact me via phone, fax, email, text (if I opted in), or other automated technology. I waive all no-call-registry choices and acknowledge that my consent does not require me to purchase.
** Standard text messaging rates apply as provided in your wireless plan.
Recommended Reading


 
Animal Behavior College, Inc., Schools  Private, Santa Clarita, CA*
Sitemap

*The BBB only accredits the business management of a school, not the quality of the curriculum, or training programs.

Copyright © 2000 - 2014 Animal Behavior College
Animal Behavior College * 25104 Rye Canyon Loop * Santa Clarita, CA 91355-5004