Where Animal Lovers Pursue Animal Careers

Angela

Animal Behavior College Honors the 2014 Dog Trainer In-Classroom Program Graduates

ABC President Steven Appelbaum Challenges graduates to use their training to make a difference

ABC President Steven Appelbaum Challenges graduates to use their training to make a difference

Animal Behavior College celebrated its third graduation class during a commencement ceremony on June 13 honoring the many achievements of its Dog Trainer In-Classroom Program students. The late morning event took place on the grounds of the school’s headquarters located at 25104 Rye Canyon Loop in Mann Biomedical Park, Santa Clarita, Calif.

Dressed in royal blue academic regalia, the enthusiastic graduates, some accompanied by their canine friends, sat composed during the ceremony. Many of the graduates are former military personnel who decided to use the discipline, drive and determination skills they acquired while in the armed services to train dogs professionally, ensuring dogs and their owners enjoy a harmonious and mutually respectful relationship.

“You are professional dog trainers who will continue to make a difference in many lives,” said Steven Appelbaum, president and CEO of Animal Behavior College, to an audience of family, friends and employees of the college. “The road ahead is paved with many challenges. Challenges you are equipped and ready to handle. However, readiness is dependent on your willingness to keep an open mind by expanding beyond your comfort level and maintaining a passion for learning and aspiring to continue to grow professionally.”

Debbie Kendrick, vice president of operations for ABC, also praised the graduates’ accomplishments and joined Appelbaum in presenting award certificates giving special mention to students who graduated from the program with honors. Those students include, Brian Hastings, Irma “Toni” Medina Leitneberg, Breanna Rappleya and Angel Samano Jr.

“Five years ago we came to this school with different expectations,” Angel said during his address. “We have spent the last five months since then learning what it takes to train dogs and their owners and have been given a myriad of tools to use as professionals.”

Beth Harrison, the program’s course instructor, congratulated Angel and his fellow graduates. She provided remarks encouraging them to use their newly acquired knowledge and skills to strive for excellence with the goal of “being the best dog trainer they could be.” Amanda Yocom of Best Friends’ Animal Society and Chris Gant, a former graduate of the college and professional dog trainer, thanked graduates for volunteering in the shelter and inspired them to stay compassionate about helping dogs and working with their owners to ensure a positive owner-to-dog relationship.

The students received certification for mastering various dog training tools and techniques using positive reinforcement for handling canine behaviors. The program covers everything from training basics and safety to effective problem solving and pet first aid. The hands-on portion of the program provides students with an opportunity to participate in an internship at shelters like Best Friends’ Animal Society with a mentor, giving them invaluable practical experience in real life situations.

Angel Samano, with his dog, Bosco, shares how the Dog Obedience Program changed his life

Angel Samano, with his dog, Bosco, shares how the Dog Obedience Program changed his life

“I have more knowledge and tools at my disposal to continue to serve people in a new way,” Angel said. With his dog, Bosco, at his side, the former Marine lance corporal credits the program with helping him embark on a new and exciting career. “If you had asked me a year ago what I would do (after the military), being a dog trainer wouldn’t have been on the list. ABC has not only helped to change my life, but has helped to change Bosco’s life.”

Pets today are living longer, eating healthier and receiving more services. In fact, the jobs forecast for dog trainers and other animal care and service workers in the U.S. appear promising. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts employment will grow 23 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. With more people in the U.S. owning dogs (35.5 percent or 43,346,000), ABC certified dog trainers have the option of working for an established company or building their own successful dog training business.

To learn more about the program visit Dog Obedience Instructor Training Program or call 800-795-3294.

The Class of 2014!

The Class of 2014!

ABC Celebrates Cats with Cat Training CEP: June is ‘Adopt a Shelter Cat Month’

Cat training and management could help more shelter cats find permanent homes.

Cat training and management could help more shelter cats find permanent homes.

Cats get a bad rap.

Undesirable behaviors like avoiding the litterbox, spraying, excessive scratching and other aggressive behaviors leave many owners frustrated and prevents prospective owners from adopting a cat altogether. Interestingly, what most people find surprising is that, like their dog counterparts, cats can be trained. June is “Adopt a Shelter Cat Month” and Animal Behavior College (ABC) is commemorating the occasion by offering a Continuing Education Program (CEP) on cat management and training.

With millions of homeless cats euthanized in animal control pounds and shelters each year, ABC’s goal is to educate students, graduates and the public about this issue and dispel the many feline myths and stereotypes.

Since cat adoption information often does not discuss, convey or encourage cat training, there is an immense misconception that they cannot be trained. This misunderstanding leaves many owners and prospective owners believing they must tolerate negative behaviors. Unfortunately, this lack of knowledge leads to a greater number of cats landing in shelters with very few being adopted.

The Cat Management online CEP teaches students proper socialization techniques. With more than 40 percent of dog owners also having cats, basic behavior training is essential to ensure a harmonious and happy environment. ABC’s professionals master techniques and demonstrate ways for developing and ensuring positive human-to-feline and feline-to-canine relationships. Learning cat management and training can also be a profitable venture for pet professionals in a variety of fields.

“Since cats are generally more independent than dogs, the belief is that this somehow renders them incapable of being trained,” said Steven Appelbaum, president and CEO of Animal Behavior College. “Feline education programs equip professionals and owners with the information they need to help cats that may otherwise be re-homed or abandoned.”

With pet cats outnumbering dogs, learning how to train, manage and treat cat behaviors can be lucrative. There are 83.3 million dogs in the U.S. compared to 95.6 million cats, according to the American Pet Products Association (APPA). Increasing the public’s knowledge and understanding about cat behaviors encourages more adoptions that could save a shelter cat’s life.

The Cat Training and Management CEP program teaches students and graduates cat behaviors, training techniques and common commands. Additionally, they learn how to interpret feline body language and vocalizations and positive ways to address problem behaviors. The program
imparts an array of fun, stimulating behaviors like teaching a cat to roll over and jump through a hoop, too.

ABC graduates and students can learn more about the Cat Training and Management CEP and other CEPs by visiting the website at www.AnimalBehaviorCollege.com
or calling 1-800-795-3294.

Animal Behavior College Programs are Ideal for Career Changers

A Young Girl Holding A Clock And Making FaceMany people are re-examining their careers and making a change. Some are pursuing their passion for pets in an animal-related career by enrolling in Animal Behavior College programs in hope of either starting a business or working for someone else. Now may be the time to make the move, as the employment outlook appears promising. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts employment of animal care and service workers in the U.S. will grow 23 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations.

“Pets today are living longer, eating healthier and receiving more services from groomers, veterinarians and trainers,” Said Steven Appelbaum, president and CEO of Animal Behavior College. “The College has seen increased enrollment in our programs as demand for these skills   continue to provide excellent employment opportunities for our graduates.”

People spend a lot of money on their pets. In fact, the American Pet Products Association (APPA) estimates that Americans will spend $58.51 billion on their pets this year for food, veterinary care, supplies and over-the-counter medicine, pet grooming and boarding and pet purchases combined. High turnover and rapid employment growth is expected to provide excellent job opportunities in the areas of pet training, grooming and veterinary staff.

Animal Behavior College prepares students by offering three certification programs, Dog Obedience Training (DOP), Veterinary Assist Program (VAP) and Grooming Instruction Program (GIP), giving students the education and training necessary to compete. By combining a comprehensive education with hands-on, practical experience in an open-enrollment format that is online and convenient, students acquire essential tools, training and expertise necessary to succeed. The three Certification Programs include:

Dog Obedience Instructor (DOP). This program teaches training techniques using positive reinforcement. Students learn behavioral principles and practical ways to incorporate them into their training regimen. They learn training basics, safety, effective problem solving and pet first aid while gaining hands-on experience and an opportunity to participate in an externship with a mentor. For more information, visit http://www.animalbehaviorcollege.com/dog-trainer/

Veterinary Assistant (VAP). Students learn techniques used for handling and working with animals in a veterinary hospital, as well as situations most often encountered. The curriculum covers office, hospital and examination room procedures, surgical preparation and assistance procedures and radiology and ultrasound imaging to name a few. Students also gain hands-on experience and career building, resume writing, financial planning and effective interviewing skills. This program also provides an externship at a veterinary hospital under the guidance of a mentor. For more information, visit http://www.animalbehaviorcollege.com/VeterinaryAssistant/

Grooming Instruction (GIP). Students learn grooming techniques, health and safety, dog and cat grooming, clipper use and scissor control techniques, body styles and breed specific cuts and pet CPR and first aid. Students learn ergonomics and ways in which to perform tasks without causing any strain or damage to their joints and muscles. This program also includes a hands-on externship. For more information, visit http://www.animalbehaviorcollege.com/Grooming/

DOP and VAP students attain significant business-building tools to help them succeed in the industry. They learn everything from how to create a business plan to budgeting and marketing techniques. Additionally, they learn skills necessary to work as an employee in the pet industry like resume writing and job searching.

ABC also offers a variety of continuing education programs (CEPs) on several subjects including, cat management and training, pet nutrition, pet massage, pet sitting and training shelter dogs. These programs help students to enhance their skills and increase their knowledge base.